The IGS PTF warmly invites all members of the community to join the Lunar New Year street party on Saturday 4 February 2023.

Learn more

The IGS Uniform Shop is now located at 278 Norton Street, Leichhardt. Ph: 02 9281 7556

The new uniform shop opening hours are:

Monday 1pm – 6pm
Tuesday 7:30am – 12:30pm
Wednesday 1pm – 6pm
Thursday 1pm – 6pm

Please view Uniform Shop in Amenities for more details.

Please collect additional COVID RAHT tests from the Office of the Deputy Principals on the second floor of the Reg St Leon Building in Kelly Street.

As a result of the global pandemic, there has been a noticeable shift in the amount of time people spend on screen-based devices. Families are transitioning back to pre-COVID routines but many are still struggling to re-establish the boundaries and rules around screen use. Some continue to deal with digital conflict and tech-tantrums on a daily basis. The latest research found that 77% of teenagers spend more than five hours on screens per day, but it is important to note that not all screen time is considered equal.

Parents play a crucial role in modelling a positive and healthy approach to using screens and assisting children to navigate the content they watch. It is better to model and mentor screen use, rather than monitor it. Children tend to do more of what they see us do, and less of what we tell them to do. However, it is still important to outline the risks and highlight the benefits of screen use to ensure you keep a balanced attitude. Encourage discussions around the issues that people experience in monitoring their screen time and be honest about your own difficulties.

Parents need to remain firm in their approach to managing screen time. Excessive screen time can be detrimental to a child’s overall wellbeing. Ensuring the correct privacy settings are in place is vital to prevent children from being inadvertently exposed to inappropriate content or online predators. Parents need to also be mindful of the potential impact screen time can have on a child’s social, emotional, educational, behavioural, and even physical domains.

In this edition of SchoolTV, care-givers will be provided with a range of guidelines and strategies to help manage screen time at home. We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this month’s edition, and we always welcome your feedback.

If you do have any concerns about the wellbeing of your child, please contact the school for further information or seek medical or professional help.

Here is the link to this month’s edition https://igssyd.nsw.schooltv.me/newsletter/managing-screen-time

We are pleased to advise that a new edition of this valuable safety
resource is now valuable online with updated safety content.

We urge all parents and carers to download this latest edition and
discuss the safety content with your children. Read the new edition here.

Vaping is becoming a trendy pastime that is growing in popularity across Australia, especially amongst teenagers. It is the act of inhaling a vapour created by an electronic cigarette, or e-cigarette. Many teenagers are succumbing to peer pressure around this risk-taking activity due to the ease of accessing and hiding vapes. They are often cheaper than conventional cigarettes, making it more cost-effective and attractive to young people.

Although under 18s are not legally allowed to purchase any type of e-cigarette or vaping product in Australia, teenagers are finding ways to access them online. Australia has strict regulations in place for nicotine-containing products, and attempts are being made to regulate vaping and ban the importation of them. Many of the flavoured liquids associated with vaping, contain not only high levels of nicotine, but other potentially harmful additives. Many of these “e-liquids” contain chemicals that are likely to be toxic, that when inhaled or vaped repeatedly, can cause severe damage to the lungs.

Vaping is often marketed as being the “healthy” alternative to smoking. However, doctors strongly advise that if you do not smoke, then you should not start vaping. Most teenagers are unaware of the associated risks and potential impact vaping can have on their development and overall health. Parents are encouraged to discuss the dangers of nicotine addiction and include e-cigarettes in the discussion alongside alcohol and drugs.

This Special Report highlights the facts around vaping and e-cigarettes and what are the potential risks. We hope you take time to reflect on the information offered in this Special Report, and as always, we welcome your feedback.

If you do have any concerns about the wellbeing of your child, please contact the school for further information or seek medical or professional help.

Here is the link to your special report https://igssyd.nsw.schooltv.me/wellbeing_news/special-report-vaping-au

Around the world, people are saddened and devastated by the events unfolding in Ukraine. Both adults and young people alike are feeling the stresses of war from afar as they experience fear, frustration and helplessness. The 24 hour news cycle has shown us upsetting images raising many questions, especially for our young people, about what is happening.

Parents and caregivers need to be guided by their child’s curiosity. There is strong evidence to suggest that having a supportive discussion about a stressful event in a developmentally appropriate way, can actually decrease distress. It’s best to “name it, to tame it.” This will also combat any misinformation to which they have most likely already been exposed to through social media, pictures or video clips.

Children need to know that they are being taken seriously. So it is recommended that you don’t avoid the difficult questions. Ensure you address their questions honestly and sensitively. With less life experience than adults, young people may need help navigating news about this crisis. Use this is as an opportunity to model and encourage compassionate views towards fellow humans, regardless of distance or circumstance.

This Special Report offers guidance on how best to discuss the conflict in Ukraine. We hope you take a moment to reflect on the information offered, and as always, we welcome your feedback. If this raises any concerns for you, a loved one or the wellbeing of your child, please seek medical or professional help.

Here is the link to your special report https://igssyd.nsw.schooltv.me/wellbeing_news/special-report-conflict-ukraine-au

Due to the pandemic, recent world events in the Ukraine and the impacts of the floods in Queensland and NSW, the world we now live in is a very different place. The hyperconnected nature of our current environment means that we are constantly being reminded of the challenges we face via numerous media and social media channels. Our connectivity to the digital world exposes us to a barrage of messages that can leave us feeling overwhelmed. As a result, many children and their parents are reporting higher levels of stress and anxiety.

Unfortunately, our brains have not evolved fast enough to adapt to this digital landscape. The combination of constant access to information and having little control over the situations presented, can be stressful and overwhelming. It is therefore important for adult carers to check in with their children and be aware of what information they may have been exposed to. It may not necessarily be the information itself that is harmful, but more their inability to process and make sense of it. Providing children with the skills and strategies to cope will enable them to flourish and thrive, socially, emotionally and academically.

The blueprint for parenting, based on our own experiences, is no longer fit for purpose in raising kids as citizens of tomorrow. This can be inherently stressful and overwhelming, not only for parents and carers, but children alike. If left untreated or unmanaged, constant stress and anxiety can lead to a number of behavioural issues or health consequences.

This Special Report suggests a number of strategies to help manage any feelings of overwhelm that you or your child may be experiencing. We hope you take a moment to reflect on the information offered, and as always, we welcome your feedback. If this raises any concerns for you, a loved one or the wellbeing of your child, please seek medical or professional help.

Here is the link to your special report https://igssyd.nsw.schooltv.me/wellbeing_news/special-report-managing-overwhelm

See here for more information about the Sustainable School Shop, a PTF initative to assist the community with the buying and selling of secondhand textbooks and uniforms!

 

 

We are pleased to advise that a new edition of this valuable safety resource is now valuable online with updated safety content.

We urge all parents and carers to download this latest edition and discuss the safety content with your children.

The “NSW Police Legacy Child Safety Handbook” is a comprehensive resource to assist parents, carers as well as teachers on a range of topics essential to child safety.  Over the past 10 years most NSW primary schools have received hard copies of this most important child safety handbook and have distributed them to the parents and carers of their pupils.

The handbook has been updated to include key messages about COVID-19 safety and bush fire safety with Summer just around the corner.

The updated digital edition (link below) also includes important content updates from: NSW Ministry of Health, NSW Police Force, Fire and Rescue NSW, Rural Fire NSW, Transport for NSW, Sydney Trains, NSW Department of Family & Community Services, eSafety Commissioner and NSW Office of the Children’s Guardian.

Please click here to view the updated digital handbook.

Here are also a couple of other links where the digital handbook can be viewed:

NSW Police Legacy – https://www.policelegacynsw.org.au/resources/

Child Safety Hub website – http://nsw.childsafetyhub.com.au/handbook/

If you have any questions, please feel free to email childsafetyhub@amgroup.net.au

View the special report here.

IGS has recently engaged the services of Educator Impact to assist us with monitoring and attending to our students’ wellbeing.
Each student in Years 3 to 12 will soon receive a weekly email from Educator Impact called Pulse. This email will prompt the student to complete a “check-in” of five or six questions, a process taking about five minutes.
One personal response each week will assist IGS to follow up if a child indicates they need some help.
Other responses will be made anonymously and will help IGS respond to more general feedback.
View FAQs
View Educator Impact privacy information

Please email Deputy Principal Students and Campus Life Mary Duma at maryd@igssyd.nsw.edu.au for more information.

Please see new webinars for parents and carers here.

See here a few things you can do to help keep your children and others safer during drop-off and pick-up
times during the school week.

The PTF has a new initiative with WornUp to send away old uniforms to be made into new school desks. A “pod” for collecting old items will arrive shortly. The PTF is paying for the collections and the recycling fees.

Please see the calendar for information about the next PTF Rue Kelly secondhand sale.

 

Students should be at school unless:

they have a medical certificate which states that they are unable to return to school due to an ongoing medical condition and the expected timeframe they are currently unwell.

In accordance with advice from NSW Health, parents and carers are reminded NOT to send children to school if they are unwell, even if they have the mildest flu-like symptoms.

NSW Health has requested that schools encourage anyone who is unwell or has even mild flu-like symptoms, to arrange to be tested through their local medical practitioner or one of the COVID-19 clinics.

Students and staff with flu-like symptoms will need to be tested and provide a copy of a negative COVID-19 test result and be symptom-free before being permitted to return to school.

Students who do not undertake a COVID-19 test will not be permitted to return to school for a 10-day period. Additionally, they must be symptom-free for at least 3 days prior to returning to school.

Students who have seasonal allergic rhinitis or another condition that presents similarly to flu-like symptoms are still required to get tested for COVID-19 and return a negative test result. Where their symptoms continue beyond 10 days, students should provide documentation from their GP confirming their symptoms are typical for their condition. If the student develops new or changed symptoms, they should get tested for COVID-19. Find more information about COVID-19 symptoms.

COVID-19 testing for students with complex health or disability may be challenging. In these situations, schools will ask the parent or carer to have their child assessed by their medical practitioner. Where a medical practitioner determines that a COVID-19 test is not required, documentation must be provided to the school to confirm that the student does not have symptoms that warrant a COVID-19 test. The certificate must also indicate that the student is able to return to school.

IGS continues to be vigilant when implementing infection control, physical distancing and personal hygiene protocols to protect the health and safety of students and staff. At IGS we promote the need to follow good hygiene practices such as:

  • regularly washing hands
  • avoiding sharing drinks or food
  • coughing or sneezing into your elbow, or a tissue which should be discarded immediately.

Students will be supported to learn from home in the following circumstances:

  • If they are required to self-isolate due to being a close contact of a positive or suspected COVID-19 case
  • Where the school is directed under public health advice to only remain operational for children of essential workers if an outbreak of COVID-19 was to arise in the local area.

A reminder to parents that they are not to enter onto the school grounds unless a prior arrangement has been with a member of staff.
In all circumstances parents and visitors to the school must register their attendance on school premises at Reception by signing in using the NSW Health provided QR code.

Thank you for helping us keep IGS a safe school environment for all our students and staff.

Mary Duma
Deputy Principal Students and Campus Life